iPhone and mouse events

PPK has written his impressions regarding his shiny brand-new Jesusphone. (I wonder did he get black or white?)

In his post, he tells us the initial reports for the behavior of mobile Safari with regards to things like documentation (missing), mouse event implications (game changing), and how the disjunct state of finger tapping and dragging compares with the continuous state of the traditional OS desktop mouse pointer. In particular, he points out the fact that the assumed ever-present mouse pointer (the little cock-eyed arrow which points black and to the upper left on Mac, and is white and points to the upper right on Windows) can no longer be counted on. And in fact, there is no icon any more. Your fingertip is it, my friend!

With the coming of the iPhone the mouse model has lost its inescapable logic. Mousemove, mouseover and mouseout (and even poor old :hover) have been downgraded to device-specific events that may not survive in the long run.

May not survive… hmmm, interesting impact. I think he could be right here.

But — and here lies the problem — these events are used in countless web sites and applications for a variety of purposes, and Apple simply cannot afford these sites not working on the iPhone.

Interestingly, so far Apple has found that it indeed can afford to dispense with Flash and Java on the iPhone platform, and while most complain that the checkbox isn’t complete, some argue that Apple is doing just fine and won’t be in any hurry anytime soon. Certainly demand for these babies has been extremely high so far. I would be interested to see how many of such sites absolutely depend on such functionality to work, and how many of those either change their site behaviors or create iPhone-friendly web presences as the demand for the mobile web increases. Wondering… but at the very least, things like these aforementioned mouse events – Flash, Java, and the like – are not yet queued up on Apple’s priority list, or else they chose to take the less-is-better approach. It is an interesting question: How much of the specifications do browser vendors adhere to on such a limited platform such as mobile devices? What is practical? What is feasible?

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